Indie News

Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ Is a Hit, and the ‘2001’ Reissue Finds New Box-Office Life

Paul Schrader’s ‘First Reformed’ Is a Hit, and the ‘2001’ Reissue Finds New Box-Office Life
Two very different films — Paul Schrader’s “First Reformed” and a 70mm reissue of Stanley Kubrick’s “2001: A Space Odyssey” — stand out among the new releases this weekend. The first represents a critical career high for a director who made his first film 40 years ago, while the revival is from a director who died 19 years ago, and made one of the the most modern films in 1968.

Standout documentary “Rbg” joins them, but other well-reviewed films are seeing more mixed results. However, there’s enough viable titles to fill screens while Marvel gets nearly all of the theatrical attention.

Opening

First Reformed (A24) – Metacritic: 83; Festivals include: Venice, Telluride, Toronto, New York 2017

$100,270 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average): $25,067

Schrader has a long career as a screenwriter (“Taxi Driver”) and director (American Gigolo”), but his career has seen spotty critical and audience reception. “First Reformed,” with Ethan Hawke as a clergyman experiencing spiritual crisis,
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‘Searching’ Takes Top Audience Award at L.A. Asian Pacific Film Festival

‘Searching’ Takes Top Audience Award at L.A. Asian Pacific Film Festival
“Searching,” from director Aneesh Chaganty and starring John Cho and Debra Messing, won the audience award for North American narrative film at the 34th Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival. The thriller will open nationally in August in theaters through Screen Gems.

The documentary “Minding the Gap,” directed by Bing Liu, won the audience award for documentary feature, and also was given the special jury prize for best director.

The festival gives out awards in both North American and international categories. For international narrative feature divisions, “In the Life of Music,” directed by Caylee So and Visal Sok, was a double winner, with both the audience award and special jury prize.

The international documentary-feature audience award was given to “Late Life: The Chien-Ming Wang Story,” directed by Frank W. Chen.

Other winners: “Call Her Ganda,” directed by Pj Raval, grand jury prize for North American docu feature; “Anote’s Ark” from director Matthieu Rytz,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History

Terry Gilliam’s Epically Troubled ‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote:’ A Brief History
Terry Gilliam has tried to make his film “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” for two decades, and it finally screened on the closing night of this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

It’s the quintessential production from hell, complete with on-set injuries, lost funding, natural disasters and outsize ambitions worthy of the hero of Cervantes’ classic novel. Even after it wrapped, a lawsuit threatened to derail the film from screening at Cannes, and Amazon Studios pulled out of a deal to distribute the film in the U.S.

So the irony isn’t lost on anyone that Gilliam’s quest to make a movie about Don Quixote has been nothing if not quixotic. Here’s a not-so-brief timeline of every step on the road to Gilliam getting his film made.

Also Read: 'The Man Who Killed Don Quixote' Film Review: Terry Gilliam Finally Delivers Messy Fun

1997

Gilliam
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Ava DuVernay Asked Spike Lee to Hold His ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Grand Prix on the Flight Back From Cannes

Ava DuVernay Asked Spike Lee to Hold His ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Grand Prix on the Flight Back From Cannes
Spike Lee received one of the biggest awards of his career yesterday at Cannes, where he won the festival’s prestigious Grand Prix (essentially second prize) for “BlacKkKlansman.” Jury president Cate Blanchett said the film is “quintessentially about an American crisis,” with fellow juror Ava DuVernay praising it as “startling and stunning” and saying she’s seen every one of Lee’s films. Which is to say, she appears to have been pleasantly surprised when she found herself on the same flight back from the festival — and asked him to hold his new prize.

“Let me tell you a small Sunday story,” the “Selma” and “A Wrinkle in Time” director tweeted. “We happened to be on the same flight back to NYC. And I happened to ask to see his history-making Cannes Grand Prix Prize. And he happened to say yes. And then me and about 27 other passengers stood there and swooned and smiled.
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‘Deadpool 2’ at $125 Million Could Suggest Marvel Box-Office Fatigue Has Come at Last

Is a $125-milllion opening weekend enough? Seems crazy to ask, but that’s what our Marvel-dominated world has come to. “Deadpool 2” had the third-biggest opening of 2018, and the third biggest opening for a Marvel film, after Disney’s “Black Panther” and “Avengers: Infinity War” (both over $200 million to start).

Deadpool 2” opened to over $300 million worldwide, and had a lower budget than many Marvel titles, so this should be a profitable title and then some. But it also shows the first signs of possible Marvel weariness, if only because the gross came in a little under expectations.

The low range of pre-opening estimates was $130 million, with $150 million commonplace. Judging a film by predictions is not totally fair, but at this point Marvel films are expected to shock and awe. Still, it’s a soft debut.

Why? Gross-depressing factors might include comedic sequels, the R rating films, and the absent surprise factor.
See full article at Indiewire »

’13 Reasons Why’ Season 2 Spoiler Review: The Good, The Bad, and the Lacking in Reason

  • Indiewire
’13 Reasons Why’ Season 2 Spoiler Review: The Good, The Bad, and the Lacking in Reason
There’s no denying that “13 Reasons Why” is a divisive show, especially with its second season, as showrunner Brian Yorkey extended the narrative beyond the story of teenage Hannah Baker (Katherine Langford), following her death by suicide.

Digging further into the aftermath of Hannah’s death, especially its impact on her friends, family, and school community, the season doesn’t pull its punches on examining past tragedies and inflicting new ones on its characters. Sometimes, the show made good choices in this regard. Sometimes, things went awry. Below, we dig into what worked best and what didn’t in the show’s return.

[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “13 Reasons Why” Season 2.]

The Good

Jessica (Alisha Boe) copes with her sexual assault: Anchored by an impressive performance by Boe, a major lynchpin of Season 2 is Jessica’s journey to recovery, one that the show treats with great sensitivity. Watching Jessica go to therapy and attempt
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‘Preacher’ Season 3 Teaser: Angelville Looks Like an Okay Place to Visit, but We Wouldn’t Want to Live There — Watch

“Preacher” still has more sermons to deliver. AMC has released a teaser for the show’s upcoming third season, which welcomes us to Jesse Custer’s (Dominic Cooper) home of Angelville and offers a brief glimpse of the colorful characters who will be populating this upcoming round of episodes. Watch the wordless preview below.

In addition to Jesse and Tulip (Ruth Nega) are the vampire Eccarius (Adam Croasdell), two enforcers named T.C. (Colin Cunningham) and Jody (Jeremy Childs), Jesse’s grandmother Marie L’Angelle (Betty Buckley), Allfather D’Aronique Jonny Coyne), and Hitler himself (Noah Taylor).

Based on the comic series of the same name, “Preacher” was developed by Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg, and Sam Catlin. 23 episodes have aired across its first two seasons, and the show will return to AMC with 10 more on June 24.
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes 2018. Awards

ShopliftersIN COMPETITIONPalme d'Or: Shoplifters directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda (read our review)Special Palme d'Or : The Image Book directed by Jean-Luc Godard (read our review)Grand Prix: BlackKkKlansman directed by Spike Lee (read our review)Jury Prize: Capernaum directed by Nadine LabakiBest Director: Pawel Pawlikowski for Cold War (read our review)Best Actor: Marcello Fonte for Dogman (read our review)Best Actress: Samal Yeslyamova for Ayka (read our review)Best Scenario: Alice Rohrwacher for Happy as Lazzaro (read our review) and Jafar Panahi & Nader Saeivar for 3 Faces (read our review)Un Certain REGARDBorder directed by Ali AbbasiPrix d'interpretation: Victor Polster for Girl (read our review)Prix de la mise en scène: Sergei Loznitsa for Donbass (read our review & watch our interview)Jury Prize: The Dead and the Others directed by João Salaviza and Renée Nader MessoraCAMERA D'ORGirl directed by Lukas Dhont (read our review)CINÉFONDATIONFirst Prize: The Summer of
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‘The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Renewed for Season 3 Before It Returns for Season 2

“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” has yet to return for its second season, but Amazon Studios has already renewed it for a third go-round. The news came during last night’s Peabody Awards ceremony, when Amazon’s Jennifer Salke confirmed to Variety that the acclaimed comedy will stick around for the foreseeable future.

In addition to critical acclaim, “Mrs. Maisel” has won two Golden Globes (Best Television Series — Musical or Comedy and Best Actress — Musical or Comedy for star Rachel Brosnahan) and is considered a strong contender in this year’s Emmy race. Set in the late 1950s, it revolves around its title character’s decision to pursue stand-up comedy following the abrupt dissolution of her marriage. “Gilmore Girls” and “Bunheads” creator Amy Sherman-Palladino created the show, and during last night’s ceremony she said, “You’re going to give it to us because we’re bringing home the fancy thing,
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‘Glow’ Decided to Film Its Kkk Wrestling Match the Day After Trump Was Elected

‘Glow’ Decided to Film Its Kkk Wrestling Match the Day After Trump Was Elected
Among the memorable scenes of “Glow,” one stands out as especially bold: a wrestling match between two women wearing Ku Klux Klan robes and two black wrestlers. According to co-creator Carly Mensch, the scene might not have happened had the 2016 election gone the other way. “Before [the election], there was some trepidation,” she explained last night at Vulture Festival.

“We’re doing this very taboo thing. Even though it’s wrestling and it’s part of the blood of wrestling, there was some nervousness. And then Trump got elected, and we were like, ‘We’re doing that episode!’”

Said star Alison Brie, “We were there with Kimmy [Gatewood] and Rebekka [Johnson] as they were rehearsing for the first time in their Kkk shrouds, and we were holding their hands, and we were like, ‘Yeah, fuck yeah,” Alison Brie said of the scene.

“It did just feel like, ‘Thank god this is where we work
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Tina Fey’s ‘SNL’ Monologue Features Cameos by Jerry Seinfeld, Anne Hathaway, Benedict Cumberbatch, and More — Watch

Tina Fey’s ‘SNL’ Monologue Features Cameos by Jerry Seinfeld, Anne Hathaway, Benedict Cumberbatch, and More — Watch
Does “Saturday Night Live” feature too many celebrity cameos these days? That was the question at the heart of Tina Fey’s monologue last night, which happened to feature cameos from Jerry Seinfeld, Benedict Cumberbatch, Chris Rock, Anne Hathaway, Fred Armisen, Donald Glover, and Robert De Niro. As you might imagine, it was a lively conversation.

Seinfeld shows up first, as Fey decided to allow audience members to ask questions and he’s the first to raise his hand. “Do you think the show has too many celebrity cameos these days, because I’m worried the cast isn’t getting a chance to grow,” he says. Fey agrees, and for a moment it appears as though her next question will be from current cast member Beck Bennett — but then she reveals she was actually calling on the person behind him, Benedict Cumberbatch.

Then come Chris Rock, Robert De Niro (who
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Tracy Morgan Loves Us All, and There’s ‘Not a Motherf—king Thing’ We Can Do About It

Tracy Morgan Loves Us All, and There’s ‘Not a Motherf—king Thing’ We Can Do About It
Just hours before showing up during Tina Fey’s cold open on “Saturday Night Live,” Tracy Morgan appeared at Vulture Festival to share an important message: He loves us all, and there’s “not a motherfucking thing you can do about it.” Now starring on “The Last O.G.” after years on “SNL” and “30 Rock,” the actor and comedian was seriously injured in a car accident four years ago. His friend and collaborator James McNair was killed in the crash, and Morgan’s recovery took well over a year.

“Y’all seen that fucking accident. Don’t play coy. Y’all seen it. I’m here talking to you now. With all my faculties, talking to you. There was no fucking way I was supposed to walk away from that,” he said.

Things have slowly gotten better him isince he suffered a brain injury and nearly died. “I was
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‘SNL’ Cold Open Channels ‘The Sopranos’ Finale With Alec Baldwin, Robert De Niro, and Ben Stiller — Watch

‘SNL’ Cold Open Channels ‘The Sopranos’ Finale With Alec Baldwin, Robert De Niro, and Ben Stiller — Watch
For its season finale, “Saturday Night Live” decided to channel a show with one of the most (in)famous series finales of all time: “The Sopranos.” Alec Baldwin’s Donald Trump took the Tony Soprano role, because of course he did, and was joined in the cold open by both regular cast members and other special guests.

Before any of his guests to join him at Holsten’s Restaurant in Bloomfield, New Jersey, Trump turns on the jukebox so we can listen to Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin'” once again. Giuliani shows up first to talk about his most recent appearances on Fox News, and after being thanked for his services assures his boss that he’s “the best and last client I’ll ever have.”

Cohen arrives next, visibly shaken by his ongoing legal troubles: “They said I might get 20 years unless I give you up,” he tells Trump.
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‘Deadpool 2’ Gives Maximum Effort But Fails To Break Records With $125 Million Opening

‘Deadpool 2’ Gives Maximum Effort But Fails To Break Records With $125 Million Opening
When “Deadpool” opened in February 2016, the film shattered expectations and became a phenomenon unlike any “X-Men” film before it. The hard-r superhero film set records and made the Merc with a Mouth a household name. So, when the sequel hit theaters this weekend, many were wondering if the film could capture the same magic of the first one, or if the joke was already a bit played out.
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The 4 Worst TV Show Titles of Fall 2018 and Suggestions on How to Fix Them

The 4 Worst TV Show Titles of Fall 2018 and Suggestions on How to Fix Them
What’s in a name? It could be a TV show’s destiny. The name of a TV series could make or break it, depending on if viewers are even willing to give it a chance. It’s a foot in the door, and sometimes that foot will get slammed if the audience is put off by its title. Remember “$#*! My Dad Says,” “Gcb,” or “The Knights of Prosperity”? There’s a reason you don’t.

For the 2017 Fall TV season, IndieWire called out four shows — “9Jkl,” “The Orville,” “Ten Days in the Valley,” and “Wisdom of the Crowd” — for their poor title choices. Of the lot, only “The Orville” survives, which may be more of a testament to the love for Seth Macfarlane and his specific brand of humor mixed with a love of “Star Trek.” Oddly enough, “The Orville” was probably the worst title of them all. Therefore,
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Cannes 2018. Correspondences #12: A Generational Romance and Closing Fragments

The Notebook is covering Cannes with an on-going correspondence between critics Lawrence Garcia and Daniel Kasman.Dear Danny,Aside from the closing ceremony, the last day of Cannes features a rerun of the entire competition slate in a number of venues across the Palais des Festivals, which gives lingering festival-goers—or mostly just the tired, sleep-deprived press corps—a chance to revisit favorites or just catch up with missed titles. That’s how I managed to watch Christophe Honoré’s under-seen, somewhat undervalued and resolutely blue (in both tone and color palette) Sorry Angel, an intimate queer relationship drama set in Paris, 1993. The setting immediately recalls Robin Campillo’s recent Bpm, a film that fervently fused the political and personal in its depiction of the Paris chapter of Act Up in the early 1990s. But Honoré’s vision is less propelled by political agitation—though Act Up Paris is mentioned,
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‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: Tina Fey’s Finale Addresses the Season’s Issues but Also Doesn’t Care

‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: Tina Fey’s Finale Addresses the Season’s Issues but Also Doesn’t Care
The thing to understand about Tina Fey as an “SNL” host is that while she has her fingerprints on some truly brilliant comedy (both in the TV and film realms), her tenure on the show as a cast member wasn’t about being the star of the show. She’s not a Kate McKinnon or a Cecily Strong or an Aidy Bryant, she wasn’t a Kristen Wiig or an Amy Poehler or a Maya Rudolph. In fact, back when she hosted “SNL” in 2013, her monologue joked about the fact that she had no recurring characters. She, of course, became the face of Weekend Update with Jimmy Fallon and then Amy Poehler, but Fey’s existence as a talent was never as the star until her host/guest appearances (like as Bedelia’s mother or especially as Sarah Palin). Because she’s “just… pleasant.”

So the expectation, unlike with other hosts,
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Cannes 2018: The 11 Best Movies of This Year’s Festival

  • Indiewire
The 2018 Cannes Film Festival has ended, but the movies are very much still with us. This year’s festival started with a Netflix controversy and hosted major activism around women in the film industry. But despite the many conversations swirling around the festival environment, Cannes was still a film festival. So how were those movies, anyway?

Early on, this year’s program was assailed for lacking star power and many A-list auteurs, but in retrospect, not of that skepticism really gelled with a selection that ranged from newcomers to veterans, and from stars to fresh faces — and it all cast an exciting spotlight on movies from around the world. Here are the best of the bunch.

“Arctic”

This may be a low bar to clear, but Joe Penna’s directorial feature debut is one of the best movies ever made about a man stranded in the wilderness. Mads Mikkelsen, throwing
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Cannes Film Festival 2018: Winners and Losers Inside the Perfect Storm

Cannes Film Festival 2018: Winners and Losers Inside the Perfect Storm
Cannes must serve many masters. Over 70 years, the festival has expanded to fulfill many sets of expectations: red-carpet black-tie glamour from the biggest movie stars, breaking news and celebrity interviews for the 4,000 global press, a vital film market for international buyers and sellers, and of course the films that will be assessed by the media and world’s most exacting critics.

But this year, festival director Thierry Fremaux found himself in a perfect storm. With a shrinking smart-film market that offers narrow margins of error, a Cannes acceptance can inspire equal measures of pride and terror. Fremaux probably should have changed the timing for critics’ screenings years ago, before so many festival regulars — from Canadian enfant terrible Xavier Dolan to lauded French auteurs Jacques Audiard and Olivier Assayas — opted out of attending in favor of the less-risky, Oscar-friendly fall festival circuit.

“Cannes can be brutal if you don’t get the right reception,
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Cannes 2018. Correspondences #11: The Dead, the Kyrgyz, and the Writer

The Notebook is covering Cannes with an on-going correspondence between critics Lawrence Garcia and Daniel Kasman.Dear Lawrence,You’ve delved into one of the more bravura and impressive films that debuted in the Un Certain Regard sidebar, Bi Gan’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night, a film whose considerable vision and ambition has prompted some to question why it wasn’t in the main competition. A far more modest film but one that also appearing as a surprise in this too-often blasé section was a patient and immersive ethnographic fiction, The Dead and the Others. Shooting in the verdant northeastern Brazil in the village of Pedro Branch, the two filmmakers, João Salaviza and Renee Nader Messora, have collaborated with the indigenous Kraho people there to fashion a discreet fable whose pleasures lay more in its observations than its drama. The film begins with a fantastic nocturnal encounter, between
See full article at MUBI »
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